Waking Gods (Sylvain Neuvel)

1 star

An unknown vessel, not of this world, materializes in London. A colossal figure towering over the city, it makes no move. Is this a peaceful first contact or the prelude to an invasion?

Every child has nightmares. But the only thing scarier than little Eva Reyes’ dreams – apocalyptic visions of death and destruction – is the habit they have of coming true…

Scientist Dr Rose Franklin has no memory of the last few years. The strangers she works with say she died, and was brought back to life. The question is not just how … but why?

Kara Resnik and Vincent Couture fell in love during war, and have found peace since. They are the thin line of defence against what is coming. But they do not know they have been living a lie.

And a man who claims to have the answers has his own agenda. There are things he cannot say – and others he won’t.”

Ok, the lesson I’m going to take out of this is that if I’m not all that fond of book one the likelihood is that I’m not going to like book two at all…

All my least favourite parts of ‘Sleeping Giants’ took a front seat in the sequel. It’s a book about giant robots and the annihilation of the human race, I couldn’t honestly care less about a questionable love story between two characters that I only mildly had any feelings for.

It’s a book that thinks that it’s more intelligent than it actually is…there were a couple of points during the DNA/sepsis exposition that I was sitting there as a medic thinking ‘you just described 1+1=2 in the most roundabout and smug way possible’. Also, choosing the BRCA2 mutation as one of the genetic markers for imperfect humanity was pretty insensitive, maybe they should have made up some gene mutations instead of choosing ones that people die from every year.  At about 10% I’d pretty much reached the decision that this just wasn’t a book for me, but I kept reading, ever hopeful and marginally curious about what would happen. That was a poor decision on my part.

There’s a reason that I don’t choose to read film scripts, because the lack of internal thought process and visuals is boring as hell to a reader. Maybe it was more interesting to listen to as an audiobook but I’m not sure that I can be bothered to try. I know that I mentioned World War Z in the first review as well, but, honestly, that’s proof that I do quite enjoy the interview format if it’s done well. The transcribed audio logs in ‘Waking Gods’ were embarrassing to read, it put me in mind of old manuscripts that I wrote when I was eleven, stilted dialogue and too many ‘noooooooos’ for me to be able to take it seriously. Let’s be honest, an audio recording is not going to hear what you’re saying if you’re screaming, it’s just going to come out as a lot of ear bleeding static.

This had a great premise, giant robots is one of the quickest ways to get me on side when I’m trying to choose media…but it was just so dull, and the fact that I could completely skim huge chunks of text and still know what was going on didn’t exactly made me want to read it in any more detail. Sometimes books and readers just don’t click and I think that might have been the case here. Maybe the audiobook would have been better? I know that I would have enjoyed a film version a lot more? All I know is that I went in wanting giant robots and got a love story…eugh.

Thank you to Penguin Books and Netgalley for a copy in return for an honest review.

 

 

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Sleeping Giants (Sylvain Neuvel)

3 stars

I went into this book expecting giant space robots and, rather disappointingly, barely got any giant space robots. It’s probably slightly the fault of my own expectations that I didn’t enjoy this as much as I thought I would, but, nevertheless, this is not the book that I was hoping for.

The book opens with a scientist recollecting how, as a young girl, she stumbled across an ancient hand of glowing turquoise lines in the woods of South Dakota, and how the circuitous effects of fate have lead to her becoming the lead researcher on  the project years in the future. The early parts of the book are engaging, raising questions as to what the hand is, where it came from, how old and, most interestingly, who made it? From the blurb we know it’s not human made, surpassing even our earliest attempts at civilization, and made from a substance only found in tiny quantities on Earth, hence beginning a long and tortuous process to try and find the other parts of what is thought to be an enormous humanoid machine.

Now, that sounds really cool, I’m getting images of Pacific Rim, Voltron, Evangelion..but the thing is that we just never really see any action. This entire book is politics and military wrangling, which, you know, is interesting in its own way but isn’t what I went into the story expecting. I couldn’t help but feel that this would make a much more interesting TV series or game than book. I’m not say there weren’t interesting points, I wouldn’t have given it three stars if there wasn’t something anchoring me to the plot, for example, further exposition on the origin of the giant robot is something I will definitely be picking up the next book for and the ‘cold war’ events of the novel were at times really interesting. There were just a lot of things I wasn’t particularly fond of.

Unfortunately, one of those was the format. I think that the ‘interviews and logs’ style of writing can work really well, World War Z immediately comes to mind as my favorite example of the form, I just don’t think that it worked for me in this novel. When writing a book that is almost exclusively dialogue, the most difficult thing is giving each character a voice of their own. The only character in this novel that was instinctually recognizable was the ‘Interviewer’, everyone  else had a disappointingly similar tone. I found it difficult to care about characters when they were all written in pretty much the same way and found myself skipping large chunks of text when it started to sound more like a speech than actual dialogue.

So, all in all, not one of my favorites.  I can’t quite shake the feeling of disappointment that I experienced on ending this story. Who knows, maybe book two will be a pleasant surprise.