Moroda (L.L. McNeil)

4 stars

I was pretty much sold on this book the moment the author described it as princes, dragons and sky pirates. Moroda is a young woman thrown into a jail cell after speaking out against an Arillian Lord  who seems to have her people in thrall. Normally quiet and unassuming, Moroda is forced into an unlikely alliance with a Sky Pirate named Amarah when a dragon attacks the city. The slaying of the usually peaceful dragon by a mysterious Arillian hunter and the realisation that the creature may have been under a similar thrall to the people of the town, sends Moroda, and a motley crew of fellow travellers, across continents in search of answers.

‘Moroda’ was a classic fantasy novel in almost every respect, from the wide range of magical races to the dragons and in depth consideration of personal values and morals. Our protagonist Moroda, and indeed the dragons within book, are advocates of nonviolent methods of conflict resolution. Indeed, the whole premise of the book seems to be that war between humanoids is pretty much meaningless in the face of the damage that we wreak on our environment and our world. What use is an end to war, when the destruction we’ve wrought with kill us all anyway? The question raised at the very end of the story seems almost to be ‘do these people even deserve the world that they live in?’

One of my favourite parts of the novel was the dragon lore. We have a world where the souls of dragons are the source of almost all magical power, to the extent that the oldest Sevastos dragons are pretty much worshipped as gods and creators. Phoenixes are found in greater numbers near the largest dragons, attracted to their heat and power,  and phoenix feathers can be used to scry for their location.

Alongside the dragons there are several humanoid fantasy species. Arillians are winged beings with a strange magic of their own; the Varkain are grey skinned creatures that can transform into venomous snakes and the Ittallans are also shapeshifters, though more humanoid in appearance.

One thing that I’ve heard recently from some of my friends is how eager they are for a fantasy series that doesn’t focus on romance. ‘Moroda’ was entirely romance free, and whilst I personally prefer a love subplot, I can totally see why that would be a selling point for many people!

I was also impressed with the ending, it really made sense with the tone of the rest of the novel, focusing on non-violence and sacrifice. I’m interested to see where the rest of the series goes from this, who of the characters will be the focus and, to be honest, whether any of them with even survive! It’s been a long time since I’ve been unable to predict where a series will go and it’s honestly quite exciting to be able to say that!

The not-so-good:

It’s only a small thing but during the reading experience I really felt as if we needed a map. I was having trouble working out where people were going and what they were doing. Ironically, I rarely actually look at maps in books, but I felt myself turning the page to go and look for one a couple of times whilst reading this. Something to consider for future books in the series maybe!

The other small criticism I have is that the book felt very dialogue heavy. The thing with dialogue is that I like it fleeting and to try and mirror actual speech as much as possible, otherwise I end up skimming it. Pretty much every explanation in this book took place via speech and I wondered whether it would have been better explained via an internal voice recap, a letter or some other method, to allow the speech to be more playful and less ponderous.

Conclusion

It’s been a while since I read a pure adventure fantasy and it was really refreshing to do so. Dragons, soul magic and sky pirates all combine into a rollicking start to what looks to be an interesting series. I look forward to seeing where the next book takes what is left of our motley crew!

Many thanks to L. L McNeil for a free copy in return for an honest review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.

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