The Edge of Everything (Jeff Giles)

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☆☆☆☆☆

I started ‘The Edge of Everything’ in a bit of a book slump. I’d set aside two books in the days beforehand and was generally looking for a novel with that special something to pique my interest once more.

The book opens in the midst of a snow storm with our protagonist Zoe venturing out to search for her little brother and their two dogs who have gone missing in the wild weather. Zoe has had a terrible year, losing her father in an accident and her elderly next door neighbours in mysterious and violent circumstances. The last place she wants to be is ploughing through the snow, looking for a little brother that she is petrified could be dead.

She finds her brother, freezing cold but alive in the snow, and they seek refuge in the abandoned house of their dead neighbours. You believe the worst has come, that the shelter they find will save them, that they will be allowed to wait the storm out in warmth and peace. But when is anything ever that easy?

A mystery assailant puts Zoe and her little brother in desperate danger. Terrified and alone she begins to wonder whether there is truly any way out of this situation. But she’s not expecting the entry of a nameless stranger with weird powers and a body marked with bizarre tattoos. She’s certainly not expecting him to go straight for her assailant’s soul…

What happens in the moments after changes everything for Zoe and the nameless stranger. Rules are broken, orders disobeyed and everything Zoe thinks she knows about the world begins to start crumbling around her…

This was a wonderful book, tight and dense and filled to the brim with fresh ideas. It’s a book that you read in a daze, utterly immersed in the bleak and lonely world that Giles has created. It raises questions about family relations, grief and what it means to sin.

Without spoiling too much, I loved Giles description of the Lowlands, the mysterious ‘underworld’ that our heroic stranger, X, hails from. The rules, the hierarchy, the bleak Norse melancholy. The ending leaves it wide open for a sequel and I can not wait to hear more about this particular part of the story.

Giles creates a great sense of place. Whether it be Zoe’s lonely mountainside home, the wide flats of the Lowlands or the remote inhospitality of a Canadian shoreline, you feel the atmosphere of each place spreading its tendrils through every scene.

The decision to limit the active cast of characters was also a great idea, it made the interactions between those who were present all the more vivid. The dynamic of Zoe’s family, grieving and fatherless, and the insertion of X into the mix creates some hilarious and heartfelt moments, especially those between our nameless stranger and Zoe’s lonely little brother.

My one qualm is the ‘ending’, it felt rather like it existed solely to make way for book two. The true ending of the book comes a little while before the final page in a twist that’ll make your heart suddenly a rather uncomfortable presence in your throat.

Would I recommend this book? Most definitely! I can imagine curling up under a blanket with it howling a gale beyond the window pane, book in hand.  It also doesn’t hurt that the front cover is gorgeous, I can’t wait to get a physical copy for pride of place on my shelf. A sequel couldn’t come soon enough!

‘The Edge of Everything’ is released on the 31st of January 2017 through Bloomsbury. Many thanks to Bloomsbury Publishing for the review copy in return for an honest review.

Six of Crows (Leigh Bardugo)

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☆☆☆☆☆

I give this book 4 MILLION KRUGE *cough* stars…

It took me way too long to get around to reading this book. I hadn’t actually finished the Grisha trilogy until a month or so ago and I wanted to save SOC for my summer reading. I’m very very glad I did.

Six of Crows is a book to be savored, to be devoured and thought about to the exclusion of all else. I read it on a balcony overlooking Lake Garda in the searing summer heat with a flute of cold Prosecco but I would have adored it even if I had been sitting in my room in wet, humid old Britain.

I will be honest and say that the concept of a heist, when I first read the blurb, didn’t entirely interest me that much. I was drawn in more by the beautiful graphics I’d seen on tumblr and the rabid praise of my friends. If you, like me, aren’t entirely drawn in by the Ocean’s Eleven style premise, I do suggest you put aside your prejudices and pick it up regardless. To me this book was more about characters and the relationships between them, which is EVERYTHING I am interested in as a reader. That and humour that is sharp as a whip crack.

We are introduced to a ragtag band of criminals and residents of the less than salubrious Ketterdam district of ‘The Barrel’. The amoral dagger sharp gang lieutenant Kaz, card loose, gun touting Jesper, and our ‘whisper on the wind’ assassin Inej of the ‘Dregs’. From there the plot thickens, involving some rather nasty experimentation with captive Grisha, a sketchy Merchant Lord and a prudish Witch Hunter who pretty much despises everything that makes up the ‘Dregs’ (and yet finds himself rather uncomfortably beholden to them). See also, our runaway, cake loving Ravkan Nina and the wispy haired demolitions man (*cough* boy) Wylan.

The characters in this book are everything. I can’t even begin to tell you how many hours I spent with my brother laughing at the idea of each of them in different situations. They’re so real, so rich and utterly hilarious. Of course, this wouldn’t be one of my favourite books of all time if they weren’t also all nursing deeply traumatic backstories.

This book will grab you by the scruff of the neck and leave you hostage to the need to just keep turning the pages. There are three sections that I call the ‘chapters of unmentionable pain’ and, I warn you, they are very much as horrific as they sound.

You do not have to have read the Grisha trilogy to read and enjoy this. My brother was my test subject in regards to this and he seemed to love it every single bit as much as I did regardless of having not been familiar with the world beforehand.

I utterly adored this book, I’m sure there are ten thousands things I could have talked about in this review that I’ve managed to miss (like the fact I literally ship everything and everyone, amazingly diverse characters and a disabled protagonist!!!) but I would rather just tell you it was bloodydamn amazing and that you should go and read it and then come back and yell at me in excitement!!

Ariah (B.R. Sanders)

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“When you’re very young and you’re different, you begin to believe that no one has ever been as different as you and that no one has ever felt that difference as keenly as you.”

When I sit down to write I review I usually make a list of likes and dislikes. It should tell you something about how much I like this book that the list, in its entirety looked like this:

“Likes: everything about this book

-Genuinely, everything”

The book begins with Ariah, a young elf, journeying far from his familial home to study with a mentor who will help him control his rather unusual gifts. He lives in a world where elves are looked down upon by their human compatriots. Ariah is part Semadran, an ethnic variant of elves with strict and conservative family values, and part Red Elf, a wilder, more carefree people who don’t hold with the same traditions as the Semadrans. Ariah is a mimic, a gift that allows him to learn language and the nuances of voice with ease, but he is also something more dangerous, something he tries very hard to play down and hide. He is part shaper, very in-tune with others’ emotions, able to manipulate the emotions of others and can find himself losing all sense of who he is the great sweep of others minds. It is a gift that is heavily regulated in the empire and is viewed with great mistrust.

He begins his training with Dirva, his mentor, but familial problems lead to Ariah travelling beyond the borders of the empire alongside him. There he meets Dirva’s younger brother, Sorcha, and comes face to face with the realization that he does not know himself at all.


This is a wonderful, beautiful book. I don’t think I’ve read a book that’s lingered with me after reading the last page quite like this in a long time. I want to read it again even though it’s only been a handful of hours since I put it down. I can’t tell you how long I have been looking for a book like this. Beautiful, beautiful fantasy world building with diverse incredibly written characters and relationships that are delightfully non-heteronormative. As a bisexual fantasy lover this was a dream come true.

‘Ariah’ is very much a character as opposed to plot driven book. That’s not to say that nothing happens because by the end of the book you feel as if you’ve been on an odyssey with the main character, but if you’re looking for page after page of action then you might be disappointed. In my humble opinion, this is honestly some of the best character writing I have ever come across. You feel as if you could reach out and actually touch the characters they are painted so vividly. I love Ariah, I love Sorcha, I love Shayat and Dirva, I’m having a very hard time putting into words just why and how. They are all imperfect people, you embrace every inch of them through Ariah’s eyes, every feature and flaw, every moment of affection or miscommunication. It is very intense and strangely comforting.

“For some of us, the places we come from are not the places we belong, and never were, and never will be.”


Sanders touches on some very important issues in this book, most notably the idea of ‘difference’ and what it means to be ‘different’. I adored the way they handled Ariah’s internalised homophobia due to his strict upbringing and the effect that has on his sense of self after he develops intense feelings for Sorcha. The fact that Ariah has very little sense of self to begin with, that he ‘loses himself’, molds himself to the wants and whims of others, damaging himself in the process, becoming whatever he feels the other needs. The book ponders the different types of love, the different types of need, and the different possibly configurations of personal relationships. It talks about gender, attraction, identity and race all smoothly bound within the narrative. It is an incredible rich book and I had a tear in my eye and a tight feeling in my throat for a lot of it. 

Sanders has incredible prose, it lulls you along, so smooth and rich, it honestly does not feel as if you’ve lost an entire afternoon in reading. I read part of this book on a train and I was very shocked when I realized I was at my destination and two hours had passed.  I may also have had a handful of very groggy mornings due to late night reading sessions…

(Also, have you seen that cover art?? Gods of cover art have truly blessed Sanders. I’ve been a huge fan and follower of C. Bedford ( @c-bedford)  for the last couple of years, so it was a match made in heaven to find their art on the front cover of my new favourite book.)


I can’t recommend this book enough. I already have plans to order a hard copy because I can’t wait to read it again, this time with the pages physically in my hands. Seriously, if you’re looking for a wonderfully written fantasy with diverse protagonists and sublime character development go and get a copy, I repeat, go and get yourself a copy now.

☆☆☆☆☆

(Thanks to Zharmae Publishing and Netgalley for a copy in return for an honest review.)

The Infinity of You and Me (J Q Coyle)

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☆☆☆ 1/2 stars

I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect when I started ‘The Infinity of You and Me’. Is it fantasy? Is it science fiction? In the end it turned out to be melting pot of both, and  a very enjoyable melting pot at that. A couple of people who’d reviewed it before me had mentioned that it was a little confusing, so I kept anticipating the point at which it would lose its way, but, happily, it never came.


Fourteen year old Alicia has grown up enthralled by the works of Sylvia Plath, finding amongst her words an escape from the inexplicable life that she is living. Alicia hallucinates strange and decaying but undeniably real worlds. The attacks come at the most inopportune moments, most notably whenever she must make a decision leaving her feeling as if she is being torn apart. Her brief absences from reality make life and school very difficult for her and they are only getting worse, increasing in frequency and intensity.

One day, drawn into a bleak and heartbreaking hallucination, she meets a boy of her own age, Jax, trapped in a dying world. Only a few days later her absent father appears to tell her that she is seeing real worlds. That she is not hallucinating and that she must try and find a way to keep these worlds alive.



My favourite part of this book was definitely the world system, especially the idea that these branch worlds are created from life altering decisions in the prime world causing a fork in possibilities. The idea of ‘roots’ and ‘branches’ and the eerie worlds, echoes of what could have happened if Alicia had chosen a different path, are so haunting and interesting. I really enjoyed learning about travelling throughout the book, beginning at the start, just as confused as Alicia and coming to an understanding with her. I actually thought it was really well thought out and not at all confusing.

I had a couple of qualms, I feel that the villain, who I won’t name for the sake of spoilers, could have been written with a little of a softer touch, that maybe their motivations were a little blunt. I also thought that Alicia didn’t seem fourteen, I couldn’t really see why she couldn’t have been older, she definitely thought and acted like an older teenager. Sometimes I also found I was caring a lot more for the world than the characters, but, considering that most of the book was about the fate of worlds I suppose that wasn’t too much of a problem.

So, all in all a solid book, enjoyable, a smooth and easy read. I wouldn’t put it on a list of my all time favourites, it didn’t create enough of an impression on me for that, but I would recommend it to friends and will keep my eye out for any potential sequels.

Many thank to St Martin’s Press and Netgalley for a copy of the book in return for an honest review. ‘The Infinity of You and Me’ will be available to purchase from the 8th of November this year.

And I Darken (Kiersten White)

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“No one expects a princess to be brutal. And Lada Dragwyla likes it that way.

Ever since she and her brother were abandoned by their father to be raised in the Ottoman sultan’s courts, Lada has known that ruthlessness is the key to survival. For the lineage that makes her and her brother special also makes them targets.

Lada hones her skills as a warrior as she nurtures plans to wreak revenge on the empire that holds her captive. Then she and Radu meet the sultan’s son, Mehmed, and everything changes. Now Mehmed unwittingly stands between Lada and Radu as they transform from siblings to rivals, and the ties of love and loyalty that bind them together are stretched to breaking point.

The first of an epic new trilogy starring the ultimate anti-princess who does not have a gentle heart. Lada knows how to wield a sword, and she’ll stop at nothing to keep herself and her brother alive.”

I really wanted to adore this book, I mean, what’s not to like, a brutal, fierce female lead, a gory and underexplored part of history, that sounds like it ought to be great. I did enjoy this book but I didn’t adore it as I’d wished.

Positives first, I thought the decision to make Vlad the Impaler a woman was great, I mean, having a female character that was largely amoral and brutal is exciting. I have some qualms with how this decision affected some of the historical elements of the book, especially the relationship between Radu and Sultan Mehmed, but, who knows, that could be addressed in book two.

I also really loved a) that it’s set in a period of history that’s been largely overlooked by fiction and b) that it portrays Islam in a positive light for once, rather than the stereotypical war mongering rubbish of many books set in the Islamic world.

The machinations within the Court and the political wrangles with the vassal states within the Empire were my favorite parts of the book. The struggles of a young Sultan and Lada’s battle to assert her control over soldiers who automatically assumed her unfit to lead simple because of her gender are the stand out parts of the novel. The personal and political implications of age, ethnicity and gender were explored in a way that never made you bored. I would perhaps have liked to witness more of the political struggles within the Sultan’s Harem, since having a female lead made that much more possible. I cross my fingers and hope we see a little more of the lives of the women in the Harem in the next book. I think their stories are just as important and potentially even more interesting.

I suppose one of the problems was that it lacked ‘richness’. I wanted to be regaled by the opulence of the Ottoman Empire, to experience the vast buildings, the rich silks and heady scents but instead I found myself feeling a little distant from it all. Sometimes I lost track of where exactly I was supposed to be.

I had a similar problem with the characters. Lada and Radu are interesting characters but they’re lacking the little something that would make them ‘fascinating’. I found Lada’s internal monologue a little ‘one track’ and repetitive, and whilst I generally enjoyed her character I wasn’t sure it was as fully realised as it could have been. I would have liked to have gone a bit deeper into her motivations and maybe focused a little less on her preoccupation with Mehmed.

I found Radu’s motivations clearer, I liked his quiet, intense internal dialogue and the way he worked around the problems he faced. I was less interested in the tortured LGBT plotline…I wondered why we couldn’t have a Radu confident in his sexuality, after all, in history Radu and Mehmed were supposedly lovers.

I also felt that Lada wasn’t entirely the ‘feminist’ lead she was touted to be…or, at least, she wasn’t given a chance to be. She struggled with a lot of internalized misogyny, seemed to, at times, openly despise Radu’s more ‘feminine’ attributes and just generally seemed to dislike every single female character she met in the book (not that there were many…). I’m hoping it’s part of her character arc, that she realizes the strength in being a women, not simply in trying to emulate the behaviour of the men around her, but I think we’ll just have to wait and see.

Objectively, this was good book. However, it didn’t give me that sensation of mindless love I get after reading some books, where just thinking about it makes my heart leap. It gets 3.5 stars because, despite my problems with it, it’s fresh, interesting and generally well executed.

I will be really curious to see where the next book takes us.

Many thanks to Penguin Random House Books who gave me a copy of the book in return for an honest review.